Umpqua Watersheds
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Glossary
Glossary

Abbreviations


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  Glossary   F
Fauna
The animal life of an area.
Felling
Cutting down trees.
Fifth-field Watershed
Watershed that typically averaged 87,000 acres in size. Provides a useful scale for assessing water-related issues.
Final cut
(See Shelterwood.) Final cut removes the few trees remaining in a shelterwood cut. Officially "The removal of the last seed bearers or shelter trees after regeneration of new trees has been established in a stand being managed under the shelterwood system of silviculture".
Fire cycle
The average time between fires in a given area. In the Umpqua basin, the natural fire cycle is about 50 years. Problems have resulted in the suppression of this natural fire cycle.
Fire regime
The characteristics of fire in a given ecosystem, such as the frequency, predictability, intensity, and seasonality of fire.
Flora
The plant life of an area.
FONSI - Finding of no significant impact.
A declaration by an agency that a timber sale will not harm the environment.
Forage
All browse and non-woody plants that are eaten by wildlife and livestock.
Forb
A broadleaf plant that has little or no woody material in it. Forbs are usually little plants with annual flowers. A forb is not a brush, which has a woody stem.
Forest Supervisor
The official responsible for administering National Forest lands on an administrative unit, usually one or more National Forests. The Forest Supervisor reports to the Regional Forester. The forest supervisor in the Umpqua National Forest is Don Ostby. (See 'District Manager' for the BLM equivalent.)
Fragmentation
The splitting or isolating of patches of similar habitat, such as old-growth forests. Habitat are usually fragmented from forest management activities, such as clearcut logging.
Frost heave
A land surface that is pushed up by the accumulation of ice in the underlying soil.
Fuels
Plants and woody vegetation, both living and dead, that are capable of burning.
Fuels management
The treatment of fuels that would otherwise interfere with effective fire management or control. For instance, prescribed fire can reduce the amount of fuels that accumulate on the forest floor before the fuels become so heavy that a natural wildfire in the area would be explosive and impossible to control.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z